Optical microscopy with micrometer and millisecond spatiotemporal resolution for whole-brain functional imaging
Kuo-Jen Hsu1,2*, Yung-Hsin Shih2, Yu-Chieh Lin2, Yuan-Yao Lin3, Yen-Yin Lin2,4,5, Shi-Wei Chu1,6, Ann-Shyn Chiang2,7,8,9
1Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
2Brain Research Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan
3Department of Photonics, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
4Department of Electrical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan
5Institute of Photonics Technologies, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan
6Molecular Imaging Center, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
7Institute of Biotechnology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan
8Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan
9Kavli Institute for Brain and Mind, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, USA
* presenting author:Kuo-Jen Hsu, email:k1220790108@gmail.com
The most complex organ in our body is probably brain, whose functions relies on activities among thousands of neurons and is yet well understood. Spatially, neuron is several micrometers in size. Temporally, neural activities occur within a few milliseconds. To study the brain, optical microscopies that provide micrometer and millisecond spatiotemporal resolution along with in vivo observation are indispensible. Here, we report a novel volume imaging optical microscope capable of visualizing neuron-neuron interaction three-dimensionally within a complete brain of live adult Drosophila. Our work potentially revolutionizes brain researches and serves as a powerful tool for future brain studies.


Keywords: volume imaging, two-photon microscopy, axial scanning